Politics

Trump warns he’s not ‘prepared to lose’ 2020 election

President Trump declared that he is not “prepared to lose” reelection in 2020, saying he does not believe the official results of the popular vote count from his first election.

When asked if he was prepared to lose in an interview with told NBC’s “Meet the Press” that aired Sunday, Trump said, “No. Probably not.”

“It would be much better if I said, ‘Yeah.’ It would be much easier for me to say, ‘Oh yes,’” Trump offered, but said, “No, I’m probably not too prepared to lose. I don’t like losing. I haven’t lost very much in my life.”

“You didn’t like the fact that you lost the popular vote?” asked “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd. “That bothered you, didn’t it.”

RELATED: How every state voted in the 2016 election

49 PHOTOSHow every state voted in the 2016 electionSee GalleryHow every state voted in the 2016 election

Alabama

Donald Trump: 1,318,255 votes

Hillary Clinton: 729,547 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Alaska

Donald Trump: 163,387 votes

Hillary Clinton: 116,454 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Arkansas

Donald Trump: 684,872 votes

Hillary Clinton: 380,494 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Arizona

Donald Trump: 1,252,401 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,161,167 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Connecticut

Donald Trump: 673,315 votes

Hillary Clinton: 897,572 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

California

Donald Trump: 4,483,810 votes

Hillary Clinton: 8,753,788 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Alaska

Donald Trump: 163,387 votes

Hillary Clinton: 116,454 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Colorado

Donald Trump: 1,202,484 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,338,870 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Delaware

Donald Trump: 185,127 votes

Hillary Clinton: 235,603 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Florida

Donald Trump: 4,617,886 votes

Hillary Clinton: 4,504,975 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Georgia

Donald Trump: 2,089,104 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,877,963 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Hawaii

Donald Trump: 128,847 votes

Hillary Clinton: 266,891 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Iowa

Donald Trump: 800,983 votes

Hillary Clinton: 653,669 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Illinois

Donald Trump: 2,146,015 votes

Hillary Clinton: 3,090,729 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Idaho

Donald Trump: 409,055 votes

Hillary Clinton: 189,765 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Indiana

Donald Trump: 1,557,286 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,033,126 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Kansas

Donald Trump: 671,018 votes

Hillary Clinton: 427,005 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Kentucky

Donald Trump: 1,202,971 votes

Hillary Clinton: 628,854 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Louisiana

Donald Trump: 1,178,638 votes

Hillary Clinton: 780,154 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Maine

Donald Trump: 335,543 votes

Hillary Clinton: 357,735 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Massachusetts

Donald Trump: 1,090,893 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,995,196 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Michigan

Donald Trump: 2,279,543 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,268,839 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Minnesota

Donald Trump: 1,323,232 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,367,825 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Mississippi

Donald Trump: 700,714 votes

Hillary Clinton: 485,131 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Missouri

Donald Trump: 1,594,511 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,071,068 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Montana

Donald Trump: 279,240 votes

Hillary Clinton: 177,709 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Nebraska

Donald Trump: 495,961 votes

Hillary Clinton: 284,494 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Nevada

Donald Trump: 512,058 votes

Hillary Clinton: 539,260 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New Hampshire

Donald Trump: 345,790 votes

Hillary Clinton: 348,526 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New Jersey

Donald Trump: 1,601,933 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,148,278 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New Mexico

Donald Trump: 319,667 votes

Hillary Clinton: 385,234 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New York

Donald Trump: 2,819,534 votes

Hillary Clinton: 4,556,124 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

North Dakota

Donald Trump: 216,794 votes

Hillary Clinton: 93,758 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Ohio

Donald Trump: 2,841,005 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,394,164 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Oklahoma

Donald Trump: 949,136 votes

Hillary Clinton: 420,375 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Oregon

Donald Trump: 782,403 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,002,106 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Pennsylvania

Donald Trump: 2,970,733 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,926,441 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Rhode Island

Donald Trump: 180,543 votes

Hillary Clinton: 252,525 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

South Carolina

Donald Trump: 1,155,389 votes

Hillary Clinton: 855,373 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

South Dakota

Donald Trump: 227,721 votes

Hillary Clinton: 117,458 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Tennessee

Donald Trump: 1,522,925 votes

Hillary Clinton: 870,695 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Texas

Donald Trump: 4,685,047 votes

Hillary Clinton: 3,877,865 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Utah

Donald Trump: 515,231 votes

Hillary Clinton: 310,676 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Vermont

Donald Trump: 95,259 votes

Hillary Clinton: 178,573 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Virginia

Donald Trump: 1,769,443 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,981,473 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Washington

Donald Trump: 1,221,747 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,742,718 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

West Virginia

Donald Trump: 489,371 votes

Hillary Clinton: 188,794 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Wisconsin

Donald Trump: 1,405,284 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,382,536 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Wyoming

Donald Trump: 174,419 votes

Hillary Clinton: 55,973 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

See Gallery

“I’ll say something that, again, is controversial,” Trump said. “There were a lot of votes that I don’t believe.”

“There was much illegal voting,” he added, vaguely referring to California and a settlement by Judicial Watch requiring Los Angeles County to remove as many as 1.5 million inactive registrations as a part of a “massive voter roll clean-up.”

There is no evidence that ballots were cast in the names of any of the inactive voters.

This wasn’t the first time Trump — who in 2016 lost the popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly 3 million votes and carried the Electoral College with 304 votes — has claimed that he won the popular vote.

A few weeks after the 2016 election, Trump tweeted, “In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally.”

“I like popular vote,” said Trump, who is one of five presidents to win a presidential election while losing the popular vote. “I think I’d do better with the popular vote. But I didn’t campaign for the popular vote. You didn’t see me campaigning in California or New York.”

Trump added: “If it was up to the popular vote, I would have done, I think, even better. I won 306 to 223, which is a lot in the Electoral College, but it’s like you’re training for the 100-yard dash versus the mile.” (In the past, he compared winning the Electoral College to a marathon.)

Trump recently came out in favor of the Electoral College, which he called “a disaster for democracy” in 2012. In April, he changed his mind, saying it’s “far better for the U.S.A.”

Still, he argued in his interview that “the Electoral College is tougher for a Republican to win than the popular vote, at least me.”

Meanwhile, Democrats, including presidential candidates, have called for an end to the Electoral College and choosing the president by popular vote.

Trump credited his 2016 victory to campaigning in states where his Democratic opponent Clinton “didn’t do a good job,” such as Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania.

“They always say she was a lousy candidate,”Trump said. “I actually think that Hillary Clinton was a great candidate. She was very smart, she was very tough, she was ruthless and vicious.”

When asked if he would rather run against Clinton again, Trump said, “No. I would actually rather run against Biden. I think that would be my preference.’

‘Why?” asked Todd, who pointed out that Trump “referred to Hillary Clinton more than Trump’s would-be 2020 opponents’ in his campaign announcement speech last Tuesday.

“Sleepy Joe,” Trump responded. “He’s sleepy. She was not sleepy.”

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