China will act if its citizens are bullied, says Foreign Minister

China said yesterday that it will not “sit idly by” when its citizens are faced with “any bullying”, as the bail hearing of Huawei’s top executive, Ms Meng Wanzhou, entered the third day.

State Councillor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi declared in a speech that China “always care about the safety and security of every Chinese compatriot overseas”.

“For any bullying that infringes on the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese citizens, China will never sit idly by and will spare no effort to safeguard the legitimate rights of our citizens and the justice of the world,” he said.

Although Mr Wang did not explicitly refer to Ms Meng’s case, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said at a regular media briefing that China’s position in the high-profile case is “exactly the same” as what Mr Wang has expounded.

Reuters cited two sources as saying yesterday that a former Canadian diplomat has been detained in China, and his employer, the International Crisis Group, said it was seeking his prompt and safe release.

It was not immediately clear if the reported detention of Mr Michael Kovrig is related to Ms Meng’s case.

“International Crisis Group is aware of reports that its North East Asia senior adviser, Michael Kovrig, has been detained in China,” the think-tank said in a statement cited by Reuters. “We are doing everything possible to secure additional information on Michael’s whereabouts as well as his prompt and safe release.”

DON’T BULLY US

For any bullying that infringes on the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese citizens, China will never sit idly by and will spare no effort to safeguard the legitimate rights of our citizens and the justice of the world.

STATE COUNCILLOR AND FOREIGN MINISTER WANG YI, on how the country will protect its citizens, without explicitly referring to Ms Meng Wanzhou’s arrest.

The Canadian embassy in Beijing has declined to comment.

Ms Meng, chief financial officer and daughter of the founder of the Chinese telecoms giant, was arrested on Dec 1 while transiting in Vancouver.

She is accused of being personally involved in tricking banks to violate US sanctions on Iran and faces extradition to the United States.

Her bail hearing was extended as a Canadian judge was not convinced she would not jump bail.

Ms Meng’s lawyer has proposed to pledge bail of C$1 million (S$1 million) in cash and C$14 million in equity and properties, as well as offer for her to be watched closely by security officers and global positioning system trackers while on bail.

The judge, however, did not believe her husband, Mr Liu Xiaozong, could act as her surety as he is in Vancouver on a six-month visitor visa.

There is no guarantee he would be present in person for an extradition proceeding that could potentially last for years, said Justice William Ehrcke of the British Columbia Supreme Court.

Public anger over Ms Meng’s case continues to brew among the Chinese public, with calls to boycott Canadian goods and ditching iPhones for Huawei mobile phones.

Chinese businessmen, meanwhile, find the arrest disturbing.

“What we worry about is, you can’t without reason impede a businessman’s legitimate rights, even personal safety,” said Mr Zhang Ruimin, chief executive of major home appliance maker Haier, in an interview on Monday. “It has created a shadow in everyone’s hearts, and anyone travelling for business will be concerned.”

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Chinese state media urges Canada to defy U.S., free Huawei executive

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – Canada should distance itself from U.S. “hegemonism” and grant unconditional freedom to Meng Wanzhou, a Chinese executive detained in Vancouver on Washington’s request, the state-owned tabloid Global Times said in a Thursday editorial.

Meng, the chief financial officer of China’s Huawei Technologies HWT.UL, has been accused by U.S. prosecutors of misleading banks about transactions linked to Iran, putting the banks at risk of violating sanctions.

She was arrested on Dec. 1 and released on bail on Tuesday. She will be set free if the United States fails to submit a formal demand for her extradition within 60 days of her arrest.

Meng has no criminal record anywhere in the world and her arrest violates a U.S.-Canada extradition agreement, the Global Times said, adding that Canada could end the crisis immediately by freeing Meng unconditionally, rather than acting as the “51st state” of the United States.

“Canada should distance itself from U.S. hegemonism and fulfill its obligations to help maintain international order and protect human rights,” it said.

Authorities in China are holding former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig on suspicion of engaging in activities that harm China’s national security. He was detained on Monday.

The Global Times said there was no evidence that the arrest of Kovrig was in any way connected to the case, but said “the assumption is because Canada has gone too far and people naturally believe China will retaliate”.

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Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland warned the United States on Wednesday not to politicize extradition cases, a day after President Trump said he would intervene in the case if it served national security interests.

In another editorial on Thursday, the official China Daily newspaper accused the United States of manufacturing the diplomatic incident in order to serve political ends.

“Washington is mistaken if it thinks it can take Meng hostage and ransom her for concessions in the upcoming trade talks,” it said.

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Chinese state media urges Canada to free Huawei exec to ‘help maintain international order’

Canada should distance itself from U.S. “hegemonism” and grant unconditional freedom to Meng Wanzhou, a Chinese executive detained in Vancouver on Washington’s request, the state-owned tabloid Global Times said in a Thursday editorial.

Meng, the chief financial officer of China’s Huawei Technologies, has been accused by U.S. prosecutors of misleading banks about transactions linked to Iran, putting the banks at risk of violating sanctions.

She was arrested on Dec. 1 and released on bail on Tuesday. She will be set free if the United States fails to submit a formal demand for her extradition within 60 days of her arrest.

Meng has no criminal record anywhere in the world and her arrest violates a U.S.-Canada extradition agreement, the Global Times said, adding that Canada could end the crisis immediately by freeing Meng unconditionally, rather than acting as the “51st state” of the United States.

“Canada should distance itself from U.S. hegemonism and fulfill its obligations to help maintain international order and protect human rights,” it said.

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Authorities in China are holding former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig on suspicion of engaging in activities that harm China’s national security. He was detained on Monday.

The Global Times said there was no evidence that the arrest of Kovrig was in any way connected to the case, but said “the assumption is because Canada has gone too far and people naturally believe China will retaliate.”

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland warned the United States on Wednesday not to politicize extradition cases, a day after President Trump said he would intervene in the case if it served national security interests.

In another editorial on Thursday, the official China Daily newspaper accused the United States of manufacturing the diplomatic incident in order to serve political ends.

“Washington is mistaken if it thinks it can take Meng hostage and ransom her for concessions in the upcoming trade talks,” it said.

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Former Canadian Diplomat Disappears in China, Adding to Tensions

BEIJING — A former Canadian diplomat has been detained in China, according to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada, less than a week after Canada announced the arrest of a senior Chinese tech executive, angering the government in Beijing.

The detention could inflame tensions between China and Canada, which are already sparring over the arrest in Vancouver in early December of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei, a Chinese tech conglomerate.

The former diplomat, Michael Kovrig, has worked since early 2017 for the International Crisis Group, an independent nongovernmental organization that tries to defuse international conflict.

Previously he worked for the Canadian foreign service, where he had risen to be vice consul at the embassy in Beijing. He is a well-known specialist on East Asia and Chinese foreign policy.

“We are aware of the situation of the Canadian detained in China,” Mr. Trudeau told reporters on his way into the House of Commons in Ottawa.

“We have been in direct contact with the Chinese diplomats and representatives,” he said. “We are engaged on the file, which we take very seriously and we are, of course, providing consular assistance to the family.”

The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs had no immediate comment.

Two friends of Mr. Kovrig’s in Beijing said they had been unable to reach him by phone or email. Both requested that their names not be used, fearing unwelcome attention from the Chinese authorities. Calls to Mr. Kovrig’s two cellphone numbers went unanswered.

Mr. Kovrig’s last activity on his Twitter account, a retweeted comment, appeared on Sunday.

“International Crisis Group is aware of reports that its North East Asia Senior Adviser, Michael Kovrig, has been detained in China,” the group said in a statement on its website. “We are doing everything possible to secure additional information on Michael’s whereabouts as well as his prompt and safe release.”

It is unclear whether Mr. Kovrig’s disappearance is related to his work for the crisis group. He specialized in sober analyses of North Korea, tensions over the South China Sea, China’s involvement in international peacekeeping and other diplomatic issues.

He has often been quoted in the news media and has written commentaries for newspapers, including the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong.

Mr. Kovrig is well-known to many foreign residents of Beijing. In his work as a diplomat, he was especially interested in Xinjiang and Tibet, two large regions of China where there is considerable discontent among ethnic minority groups with Communist Party rule.

Before becoming a diplomat for Canada, Mr. Kovrig worked for the United Nations in New York and was an analyst specializing in China at the Rhodium Group, an economic research institute. He speaks fluent Mandarin.

A former Canadian ambassador to China, Howard Balloch, said that although he did not know the details of Mr. Kovrig’s disappearance, it seemed to be connected to the arrest of Ms. Meng, the Huawei executive.

Ms. Meng is accused of fraudulently evading United States sanctions against Iran, and she could be extradited to the United States to face charges.

“It appears it is retaliation with the intention of putting pressure on the Canadian government,” Mr. Balloch said. “If so, it won’t work. The Canadian court system is not susceptible to pressure. It is truly independent.”

On Tuesday, a Canadian judge granted Ms. Meng bail of $10 million, saying that the risk of her nonattendance in court “can be reduced to an acceptable level.”

Mr. Kovrig’s disappearance is likely to stir memories of Kevin Garratt and Julia Dawn Garratt, a Canadian couple who were running a coffee house on China’s border with North Korea when they were arrested in August 2014.

Ms. Garratt was released on bail and allowed to leave China, but Mr. Garratt was deported in 2016 after being tried and found guilty of spying, a charge that he later said was unfounded.

The couple’s supporters said the Chinese authorities had used their arrest to try to secure a deal with Canada over the arrest of a Chinese businessman, Su Bin, residing in Canada. He was extradited to the United States, where he pleaded guilty to stealing military secrets.

James Zimmerman, an American lawyer in Beijing who was hired by the Garratt family to press for the couple’s release, said by email that if Mr. Kovrig had been detained, the Chinese police could hold him for 37 days without access to legal counsel.

Usually, if a foreigner is detained, Mr. Zimmerman said, the Chinese police must notify the family and embassy within 24 hours, “except in situations where providing notice will hinder the investigation.”

“There is very little transparency in this process,” he added.

Ian Austen contributed reporting from Ottawa, and Edward Wong from Washington.

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U.S. lawmakers propose bill to ban sales to Chinese sanctions violators

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two U.S. lawmakers proposed a bill on Tuesday that would direct the president to ban the sale of U.S. products to Chinese telecommunications companies that violate U.S. export or sanctions laws.

The bill proposed by the congressmen – Mike Gallagher, a Wisconsin Republican, and Ruben Gallego, a Democrat from Arizona – would require that an affected company establish “a pattern of compliance” for the ban to be lifted, according to a news release.

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Huawei CFO returns to Canadian court for bail hearing

TORONTO/BEIJING (Reuters) – A top executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei Technologies returned to a Canadian court on Monday to fight for her freedom with the help of pressure from Beijing against prosecutors’ claims she cannot be trusted.

Huawei [HWT.UL] Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, 46, was arrested by Canadian authorities on Dec. 1 at the request of the United States.

She faces U.S. accusations of misleading multinational banks about Huawei’s control of a company operating in Iran, putting the banks at risk of violating U.S. sanctions and incurring severe penalties, court documents said.

U.S. officials allege Huawei was trying to use the banks to move money out of Iran. Huawei and its lawyers have said the company operates in strict compliance with applicable laws, regulations and sanctions of the United States and other parties.

Separately, Huawei appeared to suffer another setback in Japan, with the nation’s top three telecom companies deciding not to use equipment from the firm and from ZTE Corp (0763.HK) (000063.SZ), Kyodo News reported.

Sources had told Reuters that Japan planned to ban government purchases of Huawei and ZTE equipment to guard against intelligence leaks and cyber attacks. Similar concerns have left Huawei virtually locked out of the U.S. market and blocked its access to some others. Huawei has repeatedly insisted Beijing has no influence over it.

In Canada, prosecutors argued against giving Meng bail while she awaits extradition to the United States.

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Meng said that she should be released on bail while awaiting an extradition hearing due to severe hypertension and fears for her health. In a sworn affidavit, Meng said she is innocent of the allegations and will contest them at trial in the United States if she is surrendered there.

She was detained while transferring flights and appeared in a British Columbia court on Friday for her bail hearing. After nearly six hours of arguments and counter arguments, the hearing was adjourned until Monday.

China has strongly criticized her detention and demanded her immediate release, threatening “consequences” for Canada. Her arrest has roiled global markets as investors worry it could halt attempts to ease trade tensions between the United States and China.

Canadian officials already appear to be showing increased caution. The British Columbia government on Sunday said it had suspended the China leg of a Asian forestry trade mission because of the extradition case.

And in Ottawa, the foreign ministry said in a statement on Monday that Ian Shugart – the top civil servant at the ministry – had scrapped plans to visit China as part of a larger trip.

A government official, who declined to be identified given the sensitivity of the situation, cited logistical issues and said “at no point did the Chinese government say Mr. Shugart could not come to China”.

HEALTH ISSUES

Speaking in Beijing on Monday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said it was “totally up to Canada” what the consequences would be if it did not “correctly handle” the situation with Meng.

Canada did not inform China “at the first instance” of her detention, despite the two having a consular agreement, and Meng has not been given proper access to medical attention, Lu added.

“This has breached her human rights,” he told a daily news briefing. China has lodged repeated complaints with Canada about the case, Lu said.

Meng, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, has been held in custody since her arrest. Meng said in the sworn affidavit she was taken to a hospital for treatment for hypertension after being detained.

Meng also has sleep apnea and was treated for a carcinoma, lawyer David Martin told court on Friday.

At issue is whether Meng should be set free while her extradition case proceeds. The U.S. has 60 days to file a formal request; if its evidence convinces a judge the case has merit, Canada’s justice minister will decide whether to extradite Meng.

On Monday a judge could decide to set Meng free on any number of conditions, including high-tech surveillance, or to keep her in jail, according to some legal experts.

Huawei is one of the world’s biggest telecommunications hardware companies, building everything from networks to handsets and is seen as one of China’s best chances to change the global technology landscape.

It is now China’s largest technology company by employees, with more than 180,000 staff and revenue of $93 billion in 2017.

The European Union’s technology chief said on Friday the EU should be worried about Huawei and other Chinese technology companies because of the risk they pose to the bloc’s industry and security.

China’s Foreign Ministry said these worries were nonsense.

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Huawei CFO bail hearing to resume in Canada as Beijing steps up pressure

TORONTO/BEIJING (Reuters) – A top executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei Technologies is due back in a Canadian court on Monday where she’ll fight for her freedom with the help of pressure from Beijing against prosecutors’ claims she cannot be trusted.

Huawei [HWT.UL] Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, 46, was arrested by Canadian authorities on Dec. 1 at the request of the United States.

She faces U.S. accusations of misleading multinational banks about Huawei’s control of a company operating in Iran, putting the banks at risk of violating U.S. sanctions and incurring severe penalties, court documents said. U.S. officials allege that Huawei was trying to use the banks to move money out of Iran.

Separately, Huawei appeared to suffer another setback in Japan, with the nation’s top three telcos deciding not to use equipment from the firm and from ZTE Corp (0763.HK) (000063.SZ), Kyodo News reported on Monday.

Just last week, sources told Reuters that Japan planned to ban government purchases of equipment from Huawei and ZTE to guard against intelligence leaks and cyber attacks. Similar concerns have left Huawei virtually locked out of the U.S. market and blocked its access to some others. Huawei has repeatedly insisted Beijing has no influence over it.

In Canada, prosecutors argued against giving Meng bail while she awaits extradition to the United States.

Meng said that she should be released on bail while awaiting an extradition hearing due to severe hypertension and fears for her health while incarcerated in Canada, court documents released on Sunday showed. In a sworn affidavit, Meng said she is innocent of the allegations and will contest them at trial in the United States if she is surrendered there.

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She was detained while transferring flights in Canada and appeared in a British Columbia court on Friday for her bail hearing. After nearly six hours of arguments and counter arguments, the hearing was adjourned until Monday.

China has strongly criticized her detention and demanded her immediate release, threatening “consequences” for Canada if it does not. Her arrest has roiled global markets as investors worry that it could torpedo attempts to thaw trade tensions between the United States and China.

Speaking in Beijing on Monday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said it was “totally up to Canada” what those consequences would be if it did not “correctly handle” the situation with Meng.

Canada did not inform China “at the first instance” of her detention, despite the two having a consular agreement, and Meng has not been given proper access to medical attention, Lu added.

“This has breached her human rights,” he told a daily news briefing.

China has lodged repeated complaints with Canada about the case, Lu said.

HEALTH ISSUES

Meng, the daughter of Huawei’s founder, has been held in custody since her arrest. Her lawyer argues that this situation is untenable due to her health. Meng said in the sworn affidavit she was taken to a hospital for treatment for hypertension after being detained.

Meng also has sleep apnea and was treated for a carcinoma, lawyer David Martin told court on Friday.

At issue is whether Meng should be set free while her extradition case proceeds. The U.S. has 60 days to file a formal request; if its evidence convinces a judge the case has merit, Canada’s justice minister will decide whether to extradite Meng.

On Monday a judge could decide to set Meng free on any number of conditions, including high-tech surveillance, or to keep her in jail, according to some legal experts.

According to local media reports, Meng is being kept in the Alouette Correctional Center for Women, a Vancouver-area jail. Reuters could not independently verify these reports.

Meng’s wealth and power are undeniable as the financial chief of one of the world’s biggest telecommunications hardware companies, which builds everything from networks to handsets and is seen as one of China’s best chances to change the global technology landscape.

Huawei is now China’s largest technology company by employees, with more than 180,000 staff and revenue of $93 billion in 2017.

The European Union’s technology chief said on Friday the EU should be worried about Huawei and other Chinese technology companies because of the risk they pose to the bloc’s industry and security.

China’s Foreign Ministry said these worries were nonsense.

“These people have never produced evidence to prove that Huawei has affected their security,” Lu said. “To date we have never heard of a country having had any security problems because they have cooperated with Huawei.”

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Chinese Police Detain Prominent Pastor and Over 100 Protestants

The Chinese police have detained one of the country’s most prominent Protestant pastors along with more than 100 members of his independent congregation, the latest sign of a growing crackdown against what the government perceives as illegal or foreign-influenced religious activity.

Wang Yi, who heads the Early Rain Covenant Church in the southwestern metropolis of Chengdu, was detained Sunday evening as congregants gathered for services, said members of the church.

“Lord, help us to have the Christian’s conscience and courage to resist this ‘Orwellian nonsense’ with more positive Gospel action and higher praise,” the church said in a statement shortly before the members were detained. “Without love, there is no courage.”

More than 100 church members were detained on Sunday, according to statements issued by church members. As of Monday morning, police vans were parked outside the high-rise office where the church purchased space. Officers were seen carrying office materials out of the church’s property, which also includes a kindergarten and seminary.

By Monday afternoon, some of the members of the congregation had been released, although some were immediately placed under house arrest, including the assistant deacon Zhang Guoqing.

One of the church’s longtime members and member of its advisory council, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because she feared government retaliation, confirmed that church members had been detained. She said it was unclear how long those members were expected to remain in custody, but said the situation was serious.

The police in Chengdu referred questions to the city’s propaganda department, which did not immediately respond to faxed requests for comment on Monday.

In September, the authorities informed the church that it was in violation of the government’s religious policy, according to a copy of the notice posted by church activists on social media. According to Chinese law, only churches, mosques and temples registered with the government and under government control are considered legal. Others are illegal, even though since the early 1980s, official government policy has been largely to tolerate these sorts of places of worship as long as they are apolitical.

More than half of the estimated 60 million Protestants in China worship at churches like Early Rain that are not registered with the government. They are some of the most dynamic congregations in China, and widely seen as the fastest-growing religious group in the country.

Early Rain is especially prominent because of the role of Pastor Wang. A trained lawyer, Mr. Wang was a well-known blogger and film critic, and in the early 2000s was rated by Chinese media as one of the country’s most prominent public intellectuals. In 2005, he converted to Christianity, part of a wave of interest in the religion by politically active Chinese. He started Early Rain and it quickly grew in size, and now has more than 500 members.

In 2006, Mr. Wang met President George W. Bush at the White House along with two other prominent Christian activists.

Over the past few years, however, the government has made a nationwide effort to more strictly regulate spiritual life in China, reflecting President Xi Jinping’s drive to exert a tighter control over society. In 2016, it enacted new regulations emphasizing that all places of worship must be controlled by the government and banning foreign ties.

Earlier this year it took other steps, such as banning online sales of the Bible, and seeking a deal with the Vatican to normalize relations. The government has also destroyed churches or removed their steeples and crosses.

Steps against Islam, however, have been even more draconian. Hundreds of thousands of minority Muslims have been sent to internment camps in China’s far western region of Xinjiang while others have been banned from fasting during Ramadan.

Researcher Elsie Chen contributed to this report.

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U.S. says March 1 'hard deadline' for trade deal with China

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S.-China trade negotiations need to reach a successful end by March 1 or new tariffs will be imposed, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said on Sunday, clarifying there is a “hard deadline” after a week of confusion among administration advisers.

Global markets are jittery over prospects of a collision between the world’s two largest economic powers over China’s huge trade surplus with the United States and U.S. claims that China is stealing intellectual property and technology.

“As far as I am concerned it is a hard deadline. When I talk to the president of the United States he is not talking about going beyond March,” Lighthizer said on the CBS show “Face the Nation,” referring to President Donald Trump’s recent decision to delay new tariffs while talks proceed.

“The way this is set up is that at the end of 90 days, these tariffs will be raised,” said Lighthizer, who has been tapped to lead the talks and appeared to tamp down expectations that the negotiation period could be extended.

In Argentina last weekend, Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to a truce that delayed the planned Jan. 1 U.S. hike of tariffs to 25 percent from 10 percent on $200 billion of Chinese goods while they negotiate a trade deal.

However, the arrest of a top executive at China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd’s [HWT.UL] has roiled global markets amid fears that it could further inflame the China-U.S. trade row.

(This story has been refiled to correct word in first paragraph to new, not news)

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Free Huawei executive or face consequences, China warns Canada

Meng Wanzhou faces extradition to the US where she has been charged with fraud and could be jailed for 30 years.

    China has warned Canada of “severe consequences” if it did not immediately release telecom company Huawei’s chief financial officer (CFO), calling the case “extremely nasty”.

    “China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained person, and earnestly protect their lawful, legitimate rights, otherwise Canada must accept full responsibility for the serious consequences caused,” said a statement released by the Chinese foreign ministry on Saturday.

    Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s CFO and daughter of its founder, was arrested in Canada on December 1 and faces extradition to the United States.

    The US alleges the 46-year-old executive covered up her company’s links to a firm that tried to sell equipment to Iran despite sanctions.

    If extradited to the US, Meng could face charges of conspiracy to defraud multiple financial institutions, with a maximum sentence of 30 years for each charge.

    Canada’s arrest of Meng at the request of the US, while she was changing plane in Vancouver, was a serious breach of her rights, Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng said.

    The move “ignored the law, was unreasonable” and was in its very nature “extremely nasty”, he added.

    On Friday, a Canadian court heard the extradition plea, but no decision was reached after nearly six hours of arguments and counter-arguments. The case will be next heard on Monday.

    There was no immediate reaction from the office of Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland on Saturday.

    When asked about the possible Chinese backlash after Meng’s arrest, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters on Friday that Canada has a very good relationship with Beijing.

    ‘Deep freeze’

    “There will probably be a deep freeze with the Chinese in high-level visits and exchanges,” David Mulroney, former Canadian ambassador to China, said on Friday.

    “The ability to talk about free trade will be put in the ice box for a while. But we’re going to have to live with that. That’s the price of dealing with a country like China.”

    Meng’s arrest was on the same day that US President Donald Trump met in Argentina with China’s Xi Jinping to look for ways to resolve an escalating trade war between the world’s two largest economies. 

    The news of her arrest has roiled stock markets and drawn condemnation from Chinese authorities, although Trump and his top economic advisers have played down its importance to trade talks after the two leaders agreed to a truce.

    A Huawei spokesman said on Friday the company has “every confidence that the Canadian and US legal systems will reach the right conclusion.”

    The company has said it complies with all applicable export control and sanctions laws and other regulations.

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