Asia

Hong Kong braces for Sunday rally held by organisers of city's previous massive protests

HONG KONG – Ahead of a planned rally in Victoria Park on Sunday (Aug 18) afternoon, the city is bracing itself for the 11th consecutive weekend of protests even as the march on Saturday was peaceful.

For the first time, police banned the Civil Human Rights Front from holding a march and only allowed it to organise a static rally in the park that can accommodate some 100,000 people.

The Front is the organiser of massive rallies seen in the past three months: the June 9 march that drew a crowd of a million and the June 16 march that clocked two million participants – the largest since the city was handed back to the Chinese from the British in 1997.

For the first weekend in almost three months, protests on Saturday (Aug 17) were largely peaceful with no bloodshed, chaos and devoid of violent clashes on the streets between riot police and protesters.

Over the past two months, marches often start out peacefully but descended into violence, with protesters clashing with police who deploy tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd.

On Saturday, thousands gathered in the Hung Hom district for a march amid a light drizzle where they walked from Hoi Sham Park to Whampoa in Kowloon to Whampoa MTR Station.

While most of the protesters who took part in the march had stopped at the approved end point at Whampoa MTR station, others deviated into other areas.

They headed towards To Kwa Wan where they threw eggs and spray-painted the walls of the workers’ club of pro-Beijing Federation of Trade Unions (FTU). They said the FTU are the true rioters for their involvement in the 1967 leftist riots.

Other demonstrators continued on to Mongkok, where they surrounded the Mongkok Police Station, which had put up netting to prevent objects from getting tossed in.

Earlier on Hong Kong Island, thousands gathered in a rally in Tamar Park in Admiralty in a show of support for Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, her administration and the police.

The rally, billed as anti-violence, had many participants waving Chinese flags and singing the Chinese national anthem.

Organiser of the pro-government rally, Safeguard Hong Kong Alliance, pegged the turnout at 476,000 people. It added that the protesters have disrupted social order and the rule of law and are destroying Hong Kong.

In the morning, heavy showers did not stop thousands of teachers and students from showing up for a march that called for the Hong Kong government to address protesters’ demands.

Demonstrators gathered at Chater Garden in Central, just hours after a pro-independence rally at the same park the night before.

Protests began four months ago when the Hong Kong government mooted a controversial Bill – now suspended – that would allow the authorities to extradite people to countries it has no formal extradition agreements with, including mainland China.

The anti-extradition protests have since morphed into a broader movement seeking universal suffrage and an independent probe into police’s handling of the protests.

So far, the police have arrested 748 protesters since the June 9 mass rally against the Bill.

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