Europe

Brexit ultimatum: US-UK trade deal must ‘respect sovereignty’ of national standards

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The quality of US produce and standards, in particular the issue of chlorinated chicken, has been a controversial aspect of talks. However, despite the claims put towards the practice and US regulatory standards, deputy director at the Adam Smith Institute, Matt Kilcoyne told Express.co.uk the two sides should respect the “high-level of trust” between the two nations. He added: “We must reject the self-interested, xenophobic campaign against US products.

“There is simply nothing wrong with US standards or the quality of American produce, as the millions of Brits who have eaten and drunk themselves across America know very well.

“A trade deal between the US and UK should respect the sovereignty of both states in their standards-setting capabilities and the high level of trust between our countries.

“The best approach would be mutual recognition of standards.

“It is then up to consumers to decide what they do and do not want.

“British and American regulators want the same thing for their citizens: safe, healthy and high-quality products, across a range of price points — with transparent and open legal recourse for those seeking justice when standards fall short of the letter of the law.”

Chlorinated chicken, is whereby poultry is washed with or dipped in water containing chlorine dioxide.

Some have stated this practice could mask a low standard of hygiene of the meat.

Chlorinated chicken is currently banned within the EU, with the European Food Safety Authority claiming it could be harmful over time.

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During negotiations between the US and UK, Washington has stated the trade of chlorinated chicken and other products such as hormone-treated beef must be allowed into Britain’s food market.

UK ministers had initially pledged to stop the import of the products but there have been indications on allowing the produce, but under tariffs, according to the Independent.

Under the system, American agribusinesses would be allowed to sell goods in the UK without adhering to British production standards.

Although a trade deal between the two sides will not be agreed until next year, the two sides have agreed to carry out talks at pace through the autumn.

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The third round of talks concluded earlier this month with a Department for International Trade spokesperson stating “positive progress” had been made.

The statement said: “Positive progress continues to be made in many of the areas covered by an agreement.

“Both sides reaffirmed their commitment to negotiating a comprehensive and ambitious agreement.

“In terms of the timeline of negotiations, it was agreed that they should continue at pace throughout the autumn.”

The fourth round of talks is expected in September.

However, due to the coronavirus pandemic and US Presidential election November, it is unsure how the negotiations will take place in the coming months.

International Trade Secretary, Liz Truss, however, has maintained there was no timeline placed on talks.

She said during a House of Lords select committee last month: “We have never publicly stated a timeframe for the US deal and that’s deliberate.

“We do not want our interlocutors to use time pressure against us.

“We won’t set a deadline and say we will meet that deadline.”

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