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Cheers! Queen set to give pubs opening hours respite after pandemic woes

Queen showing signs of 'slimming down' the monarchy says expert

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Her Majesty, 95, will celebrate her Platinum Jubilee in 2022, marking 70 years since the monarch ascended to throne. There will be year-long Platinum Jubilee celebrations throughout the UK, but pubs are set to see a special benefit thanks to the Queen.

Pubs, clubs and bars could be allowed to stay open into the early hours over next year’s bank holiday weekend to mark the Platinum Jubilee, according to Government plans.

Under the proposals, English and Welsh venues will be able to stay open for another two hours.

Home Secretary Priti Patel is reportedly seeking to extend licensing hours from the normal 11pm to 1am from Thursday June 2 to Saturday June 4 during the extended bank holiday weekend.

Her proposals are intended to mark the “unprecedented milestone in national life”, with ministers promising a show mixing “ceremonial splendour” with “technological displays”.

Ms Patel is allowed to extend opening hours under Section 172 of the Licensing Act 2003, which lets the Home Secretary lay an order before Parliament to give permission for premises to stay open longer to mark occasions of exceptional significance.

The move to extend licensing hours will be subject to a month-long public consultation during which people can submit their views on the proposals.

Ms Patel said of the proposal: “Her Majesty the Queen is an example to us all – she has served the UK and the Commonwealth with the utmost dignity, steadfastness and resolve throughout her remarkable reign.

“The Platinum Jubilee is a truly historic occasion, and it is right that the country should mark this celebration in a special way.

“This extension will enable families, friends and communities across England and Wales to raise a glass to toast Her Majesty the Queen and mark her incredible service to our country.”

Past national events that have seen the Government push back closing time have included the 2011 and 2018 royal weddings, the Queen’s 90th birthday in 2016, and the Fifa World Cup in 2014.

Other events paying tribute to the monarch include a live concert, a service of thanksgiving and a day at the races.

On Sunday June 5, the Platinum Jubilee Pageant will also be staged in London featuring more than 5,000 people from across the UK and Commonwealth.

The event will take place against the backdrop of Buckingham Palace and the surrounding streets, combining street arts, theatre, music and circus.

It comes as royal expert Katie Nicholl suggested Prince Harry and Meghan Markle “will come back” to the UK to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight, she said: “I think we can be certain that Harry and Meghan will be coming back to Britain.

“I think the Platinum Jubilee celebrations in June 2022 are a likely opportunity for them to come over to be a part of the official celebrations of the Queen’s 70th year.”

Her Majesty took the throne on February 6 in 1952, and was crowned on June 2 in Westminster Abbey.

The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh were driven from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey in the Gold State Coach pulled by eight grey gelding horses.

On Christmas Day, said the festive season “can be hard for those who have lost loved ones” and referenced the death of Prince Philip,

In a heartbreaking reference to her late husband, she said: “This year, especially, I understand why.

“But for me, in the months since the death of my beloved Philip, I have drawn great comfort from the warmth and affection of the many tributes to his life and work – from around the country, the Commonwealth and the world.

“His sense of service, intellectual curiosity and capacity to squeeze fun out of any situation – were all irrepressible.”

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