Europe

Head of the Army admits defeat to terror as he demands Taliban ‘govern inclusively’

Afghanistan: Sir Nick Carter discusses engaging with the Taliban

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Speaking to Sky News on Sunday, Sir Nick Carter acknowledged the West must now “engage” with the Taliban in order to achieve what he suggested was a more inclusive regime that tolerates womens’ education and minority rights.

Sky News’ Trevor Phillips grilled the army’s head honcho how it “must take a lot” for British soldiers who risked their lives fighting the brutal terror group to see Western nations having to talk to the Taliban. 

The Army chief replied: “We certainly have to engage them for a number of reasons. First and foremost there are still Afghans who worked with us who we are worried will be the subject of vendettas.

“And we would like to see them find a way out of Afghanistan and we would like to look after them to achieve that.”

He added how a second concern is the spiralling humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan which is being branded as one of the worst in human history.

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Sir Nick claimed that in order to resolve the humanitarian crisis the West “has to engage with the Taliban government”.

The Army head honcho suggested this is to try and make sure any money raised by western nations to solve the crisis gets to those who need it most.

But in a bizarre moment the Chief of the Defence Staff suggested that engagement with the Taliban would also be an effort to “get them to understand that they need to govern inclusively”.

Following the surprising statement given the barbaric practices of the Taliban group, who systematically execute and mutilate opposition, Sir Nick explained this is to ensure advances across Afghan society.

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He said: “Many of the gains we have made in the twenty years that we were engaged there, we could lose if they don’t govern inclusively.

“The rights of women, the opportunities for girls to go to school and the rights of all minorities in Afghanistan need to be properly respected and if that doesn’t happen then the answer is we would have failed.”

Afghanistan is currently engulfed in a raft of crises as the now Taliban-governed nation endures food and water shortages as it heads into a bitter winter.

The United Nations has said the war torn country is now facing the “worst humanitarian disaster we’ve ever seen”.

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Some 23 million people are in desperate need for food while the $20 billion economy could shrink by $4 billion or more, according to CNBC.

While an astonishing 97 percent of the 38 million population are at risk of sinking into poverty, according to Abdallah Al Dardari, the resident representative for the United Nations Development Programme in Afghanistan.

The chaos comes as a result of world governments cutting off Afghanistan’s access to international funding following the rapid takeover of the Taliban, a move which has now crippled the country.

Government’s also froze around $10 billion of assets held abroad by the Afghan central bank in an effort to stop the Islamist terrorist group accessing vast sums of money.

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