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King Charles spotted at Sandringham House

Prince Charles to take over responsibility of Sandringham

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The pair both shielded from the rainy weather with umbrellas as they walked to church. Camilla was seen wearing a tartan skirt with a dark jacket which she accessorised with a black hat plus a blue crossbody bag with brown leather straps. Charles meanwhile was wearing a grey suit matched with a lilac shirt and dark purple tie while wearing brown suede shoes. 

It’s the first time the new monarchs have visited Sandringham following the death of Queen Elizabeth in early September.

Sandringham House is one of two homes personally owned by the Royal Family, the other being Balmoral Castle in Scotland where Queen Elizabeth spent her final days.

The home in Norfolk is well known to be the place the royal family celebrate Christmas, but the family holiday was cancelled at Sandringham House last year due to concerns over Coronavirus cases rising at the time.

It is tradition for the Royal Family to attend the Christmas Day service at St. Mary Magdalene’s Church and then walk around the local area to greet members of the public.

Darren McGrady, who worked for the late-Queen as a personal chef for 15 years, revealed how the royal family enjoyed their Christmas holidays at Sandringham House. 

Writing for the Mail on Sunday, he said: “Right from my first Christmas, I was in love with and enchanted by Sandringham”.

The chef said the holiday would kick off on Christmas Eve when the royals would meet for afternoon tea and celebrate the German tradition of Heiligabend Bescherung, which translates to “Christmas Eve time for exchanging gifts”.

The royals would likely give each other humourous and inexpensive gifts for the occasion.

At Christmas dinner, a traditional turkey would be served and Queen Elizabeth would enjoy German Gewurztraminer wine with the meal.

The chef also revealed that he would make sure to have certain royal favourite sweet treats if they were visiting, and said Prince William’s favourite Christmas dessert was chocolate biscuit cake.

King Charles has settled into his new life as monarch and the King is expected to break from royal tradition and not immediately move into Buckingham Palace. 

The current schedule for the Monarch is to spend weekends in Norfolk at Sandringham while staying in Clarence House three days a week and then will spend two days a week at Windsor Castle.

Buckingham Palace is currently undergoing a £369 million refurbishment in order to update the electric, plumbing plus heating and is not expected to be finished until 2027.

A source reported by the Sunday Times revealed that Queen Consort Camilla “doesn’t want to live at Buckingham Palace” and reportedly King Charles is not a fan of the 775-room estate either. 

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A royal source said: “I know he is no fan of ‘the big house’, as he calls the palace, he doesn’t see it as a viable future home or a house that’s fit for purpose in the modern world.

“He feels that its upkeep, both from a cost and environmental perspective, is not sustainable.”

The Sunday Times also reported that Prince William also feels that Buckingham Palace is not a suitable place for family, as the Prince and Princess of Wales enjoy their new home in Windsor.

A spokesperson for Buckingham Palace said: “It is expected that the necessary works will be completed for Their Majesties to take up residence in 2027.

“In the interim period, the Palace will be fully utilised for official business wherever practicable.”

The King has also expressed his wish to open up the more areas of the Palace and a number of other royal estates to the public in an effort to bring in more money and welcome the public further into the fold.

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