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Marriage not out of fashion! 80% of TikTok generation want to tie knot

GMB: Susanna Reid questions guest over her marriage stance

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The study carried out by OnePoll for the Marriage Foundation of the so-called “TikTok generation” of 18 to 30 year olds found strong support for traditional values when it comes to making a commitment to the person they love. It has led to calls that th eGovernment starts to consider policies which support married couples. The study, which includes a survey of 2,000 young people, finds 86 percent of unmarried women and 80 percent of unmarried men under 30 in a relationship say they would “like to get married at some point” in their life. 

Meanwhile 76 percent of women and 77 percent of men under 30 say they “expect to get married at some point”.

This compares to a marriage rate in the UK of 50.4 percent.

The thinktank has claimed that its findings help debunk the myth that the under 30s have fallen out of love with the idea of marrying. 

Sir Paul Coleridge, founder of Marriage Foundation said: “The way in which young couples meet may have changed, i.e. via dating sites and apps, but yet again our research overwhelmingly shows that marriage is as popular as ever as their long-term aspiration.  

“So why are Government ministers and many MPs still so reluctant to back marriage? The answer of course is out of an irrational fear of being portrayed as old fashioned and judgmental. 

“But as our study shows support for marriage and the desire to wed remains strong, regardless of age, class or how couples are meeting. 

“So why don’t politicians of all persuasions support this most tried, tested and successful of social arrangements which would hugely benefit the individuals, children, families and the country as a whole.”

Harry Benson, Marriage Foundation’s Research Director commented: “A dangerous and pervasive myth has developed that paints young people as a group that rejects commitment and shuns traditional institutions we usually think are more closely associated with their parent’s generation.  

“However, our study finds the opposite. Young people emphatically aspire to be married and expect to get married, clearly recognising the benefits associated with long-term stable relationships. This is great news as we mark the start of Marriage Week.”

The survey finds that neither age or socio-economic group significantly diminishes the desire to wed. Nearly nine in 10 (89 percent) of women aged 18-24 want to marry, dropping just six points to 83 percent for 25-30 year olds. By contrast, the proportion of men who want to marry, marginally increased in the two age ranges from 78 percent to 81 percent. 

While in the top economic third, nine in 10 (91 percent) of women and 83 percent of men want to marry, this drops only a few points in the bottom third to 81 per cent of women and 82 per cent of men wanting to tie the knot. 

The survey found little difference in the levels of support when how couples met was taken into account. 88 percent of women who met online want to marry compared to 82 percent who met socially in a bar or elsewhere. The figure was 86 percent of women who met in school, family or work settings. While men were a little lower in all three categories. 

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