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Meghan Markle ‘motherly’ towards Prince Harry amid ‘air of vulnerability’

Prince Harry's 'blame and angriness' will continue says expert

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Harry and Meghan reportedly wish to return to the UK soon, which would be Meghan’s first trip back since they quit the Royal Family, and their trip could even be in the next few weeks. They are reportedly planning to have Lilibet, their baby daughter named after the Queen, christened at Windsor Castle. Her Majesty has never met four-month-old Lili.

It has also been reported that the Queen remains “very fond” of Harry still, and would also love to see their son Archie again.

Harry and Meghan famously quit the Firm last year to pursue their own career ventures, and have done a series of media interviews since, notably with Oprah Winfrey.

While Harry now stars in the spotlight with his instinctive charm and gentle mischief-making, in his twenties and early thirties, a royal author noted he was not always the life and soul of the party.

Angela Levin is the author of the book ‘Harry: Conversations with the Prince’.

READ MORE: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s children expecting new playmate

She claimed a young Harry needed “lots of reassurance and understanding” in his early days at nursery, and he found the first few weeks “quite traumatic”.

Ms Levin explained Princess Diana would plot her royal duties around her motherly ones and would drive her sons to and from school whenever possible.

She added that, even to this day, Harry sometimes seems vulnerable or sad, which is perhaps why Meghan shows her “motherly” side around him.

She said: “Unlike William he [Harry] needed lots of reassurance and understanding.

“Even today he sometimes has an air of vulnerability and sadness.

“It’s part of what has endeared him to so many people of all ages and types around the world and perhaps why Meghan Markle sometimes feels the need to be motherly towards him.”

The Duke and Duchess have been very candid about their mental health in recent years, Meghan admitting she felt suicidal in their March interview with Oprah.

She said she “didn’t see a solution” and “didn’t want to be alive anymore”.

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Harry also admitted to developing severe anxiety and having panic attacks in his late twenties.

In the Apple TV+ documentary series ‘The Me You Can’t See’, Harry said he would be in “fight or flight mode” on royal duties, finding himself regularly sweating and conscious of what others were thinking.

He said: “Panic attacks, severe anxiety, so [age] 28 to probably 32 was a nightmare time in my life.

“And I would find myself drinking, not because I was enjoying it, but because I was trying to mask something.”

Growing up, Harry’s older brother Prince William was much more of an extrovert, earning himself the nickname ‘Basher’ and quite the reputation to go with it.

Ms Levin explained William’s “natural exuberance and confidence” helped him settle in like a duck to water.

‘Basher’ once threatened a classmate, according to Ms Levin, with the words: “I will send my knights to kill you when I am King”.

In stark contrast, Harry would often refuse to join in with playground games and would, on occasion, “stand alone for the entire ten-minute break and if another child came up to him and pulled at his clothes, he would start crying”.

Meghan and Harry have stood by each other through appalling amounts of online trolling ‒ the Duchess said in 2019 that she had been told she was the “most trolled person in the entire world”.

Her response to this abuse was praised as a “very royal approach” by royal expert Katie Nicholl. She told Channel 5 documentary ‘Meghan: Where Did It All Go Wrong?’: “The royals’ mantra is often ‘put up, shut up’. You can’t be seen to always answer back.

“You do have to put up at points.

“So actually her approach ‒ maintaining that dignified silence, not justifying or even giving any credence to these claims, some of which were really quite unpleasant, it was a very royal approach to things.”

Angela Levin’s book, ‘Harry: Conversations with the Prince’, was published in 2018 by John Blake. It is available to buy here.

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