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Meghan Markle royal monogram replaced in first official letter since Oprah interview

Meghan Markle 'changed the rulebook totally' says expert

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Meghan Markle, 39, penned a heartfelt letter to a British school to mark International Women’s Day on March 8. The Duchess sent the letter a day after her and Prince Harry’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey aired and in it she recalled visiting pupils at Robert Clark’s school last year when she and Harry returned to the UK to wrap up royal duties for good.

While Meghan and Harry’s official letters have previously featured their Duke and Duchess of Sussex royal monogram on the letterhead, this one has an Archewell logo instead.

The key change is likely to reflect the Queen’s decision to prevent Meghan and Harry from returning to public service a year after they stepped away.

Last month, the Palace confirmed the Sussexes would have to give up their key royal patronages and that Harry would have to return his honorary military titles to the crown.

While the couple have kept their HRH styles and Duke and Duchess of Sussex titles, they are not meant to use them in connection with their work going forward, which may be why the letter does not feature the royal monogram.

However, tellingly, Meghan still signs the letter off as “Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex” in a nod to her royal status.

In the letter, Meghan wrote: “It was this time a year ago that I had the pleasure of meeting so many of you during my visit to celebrate International Women’s Day and mark the 50th anniversary of the Equal Pay Act.

“I look back on that day with such fond memories, and think of you all frequently, especially recognising how difficult it’s been for students and families during the past year.”

Meghan also gave a mention to her and Prince Harry’s new Archewell organisation, saying wanted to encourage people “to participate in real acts of compassion for the women in their lives and their community” and learn about the “trailblazing women” that came before them.

Royal monograms explained

Many members of the Royal Family have the use of special royal monograms, including non-working members of The Firm like Princess Beatrice, 32, and Princess Eugenie, 30.

Asked to explain royal monograms and who can use them, constitutional expert Iain MacMarthanne told Express.co.uk last year: “Monograms are used by all members of the Royal Family, either an individual letter or, when a couple, both letters intertwined.”

Addressing whether Meghan and Harry could be stripped of their right to use their royal monogram, Mr MacMarthanne said: “As things presently stand, in the event of Charles becoming king, the Duke of Sussex would continue to be able to use this monogram.”

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The expert added: “Changes in sovereign do not materially affect this.

“However, dependent upon what is subsequently agreed, given the withdrawal of the Sussex’s from royal duties, this might change. Only time will tell.”

Given that it has since been decided that Meghan and Harry have stepped away from serving the crown for good, it seems likely they will no longer use their royal monogram going forward.

Meghan and Harry received their royal monogram from the Queen upon their wedding day in May 2018.

Meghan and Harry’s royal monogram features a small crown known as a coronet and their two initials intertwined.

A statement released at the time of their wedding confirmed there was a crown in their new coat of arms

The statement said: “It is the coronet laid down by a Royal Warrant of 1917 for the sons and daughters of the heir apparent.

“It is composed of two crosses patée, four fleurs-de-lys and two strawberry leaves.”

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