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M&S sparks customer fury as it makes major change in cafe

Cost of living: Bristol resident labels food prices 'outrageous'

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The UK is in a cost-of-living crisis at the moment with prices soaring across every sector. Everyone is making switches and sacrifices to save money as the price of energy is expected to soar again in October. Last month Ofgem announced the energy price cap will increase to £3,549 per year for dual fuel for an average household from 1 October 2022.

Now, Marks and Spencer is making a big change for customers.

The popular retailer is abandoning teacups and saucers for mugs in a number of its cafes.

The move means saving water and energy as it is quicker to clean a single mug rather than two pieces of crockery. A spokesperson said the move was trialled but is now being rolled out to 50 more of its cafes across the country.

They said: “We have started providing customers with china mugs rather than cups and saucers to reduce water and energy use.

“It reduces water as fewer items need dishwashing. We trialled it in 10 cafés and it is now being rolled out to a further 50. Customer feedback has been positive.”

Regular customers Ron and Jennifer Moore from Birmingham told The Daily Mail they were disappointed.”

The couple said: “They are going to be replaced with just mugs and tea bags.

“This could cost them a lot of customers, especially as us pensioners love our pots of tea. They told us that they have had lots of complaints from pensioners.

“The staff thinks it’s the cost of the electricity to run the dishwashers, so it would appear it’s purely financial.”

Marks and Spencer aren’t the only establishment making sacrifices as Bristol Zoo, one of the oldest in the world, closed its doors for the final time on Saturday due to financial losses.

Now there are fears others will follow suit.Chester Zoo is one example with 20,000 animals and five national plant collections across its 128-acre site.

Its annual energy bills usually come to £1.5million, however, this year they are expected to rise to £2million for the first time, it has been reported.

CEO Jamie Christon warned: “People have money still in their pockets [now] but are being very careful with how they’re spending it.Next year they probably won’t have that money.”

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