Europe

Not again! Covid horror for UK as Britain warned of sleepwalking into winter ‘disaster’

NHS doctors explain the Winter Vaccines

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

After a wave of infections in young people, a new study has revealed case levels are now “spilling over” into the 35-55-year-old range. This comes as vaccine efficacy begins to wane for those who had their jabs in the spring and early summer. The analysis, published as part of the ZOE study, shows that although latest figures have reduced slightly from 71,111 to 69,993 daily cases this week, levels remain too high as the country enters the critical flu season.

If the case numbers continue to increase beyond those aged 55 and under, professor Tim Spector, lead scientist of the study, warned it could spell “disaster” for the NHS.

He said: “The UK seems to be slowly waking up to the fact that COVID cases are too high, but the reality is they’ve been soaring for months and many countries have put us on their red list. Infections remain high in young people, and look to be spilling over into the 35-55-year-olds.

“If these increases creep into the over 55s it could spell disaster for the NHS this winter.

“This week a major UK Care Home provider has confirmed that based on our research, it’s now including cold-like symptoms on their visitor forms to stop potential COVID cases from entering their facilities.

“This is a bold move as it goes against the official government guidance, but will ultimately save lives, and hopefully others will follow suit.

“With cases so high, it’s clear that herd immunity isn’t happening, and the risk is most people continue to believe they are safe if they have had COVID or a vaccine.

“ZOE data shows that vaccine protection wanes over time and a natural infection alone only gives 64 percent protection, so we need to be doing all we can to get everyone double vaccinated and stop waiting for herd immunity to happen through natural infection.”

In the data released by the study, incidences among the 35-55-year-olds range began to rise around September 16.

JUST IN: Brexit LIVE: EU caves on 80% but it’s still not enough for PM

As of October 9, the study estimated the number of cases among the age group has now approached 20,000 a day after falling to below 14,000 on September 16.

While not rising as quickly, case numbers among the 55-75-year-old range also began to rise on September 16.

In the same time period, cases went from 4,000 to 6,000 a day.

The study also suggested the UK-wide R-rate is one, while on average, one in 69 people have symptomatic Covid.

DON’T MISS

Princess Anne flies to Forres paying tribute to Scottish Covid heroes [Latest]
Putin insists he doesn’t have Covid after coughing fit on live TV [Update]
Covid: 1 in 500 kids lost parent or caregiver to pandemic [Insight]

The data also shows cases in those who have not been vaccinated is approaching a peak of 20,000 a day.

However, among the 0-18-year-old age group, cases have begun to fall after reaching a high of 38,000 on September 16 – cases have now fallen below 34,000.

This comes as Health and Education Secretaries, Sajid Javid and Nadhim Zahawi, wrote to parent to encourage them to vaccinate their young children.

In the letter, the two Secretaries of State said: “We know that students have missed a lot of time in school and college since the pandemic started, and that there is no substitute for face-to-face learning.

“Keeping students in the classroom in the coming months is, therefore, a Government priority, both for their immediate and longer-term wellbeing.

“Young people who get ill will need to miss school or college, and may spread it to others.

“That is why we are encouraging you all to support your children to get vaccinated and to continue to test regularly.

“This will help to detect cases early, reduce spread, and keep students in education.”

The study was published on October 14 and tracked data until October 9.

Source: Read Full Article