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Prince William admits to ‘feeling bad’ about ‘burden’ George, Charlotte and Louis face

Prince William opens up about giving children ‘burden of worry’

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Prince George is “acutely aware” of the climate change crisis, his father Prince William has told BBC Newscast. During an in-depth interview to discuss his inaugural Earthshot Prize, the Duke of Cambridge revealed that he “feels bad” about burdening his three children with the importance of the climate threat. He also gave an insight into the lives of his two younger children, revealing that his youngest son Prince Louis “enjoys playing outside” at any given opportunity. 

When asked if Prince George was questioning his impact on the planet, Prince William said: “I think a definite sense of realisation and understanding, so the education piece is really key.

“So for instance, not overusing water, being careful with our resources, turning off light switches, things like that which were instilled in me growing up.

“So yes, he’s acutely aware, more so than the other two at the moment, Charlotte is still a little bit young, she’s still not quite sure. Louis just enjoys playing outside the whole time, he lives outside.

“But I think it is slowly dawning on them that these things matter, but when you’re that young you just want to have fun and enjoy it. I feel bad, I don’t want to give them the burden of that worry.”

The three Cambridge children currently reside with their parents at both Kensington Palace and Anmer Hall, their home in Norfolk. 

Prince William and Kate have always sought to maintain their children’s privacy, and they are rarely photographed in public aside from formal engagements. 

Prince George, eight, and Princess Charlotte, six, currently attend primary school at Thomas’s School in Battersea, whilst Prince Louis, three, has recently begun his education at  Willcocks Nursery School. 

During the interview with BBC journalist Adam Fleming, Prince William hinted that his eldest son would follow in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, after becoming “a bit annoyed” after a litter-picking excursion. 

Prince George 'confused' by people littering in the streets

The young royal had expressed confusion after he spent time litter-picking with his primary school, only to realise the litter would return to the streets by the following day. 

Prince George and his siblings have previously shown an interest in the problems facing our climate during a meeting last September with Sir David Attenborough. 

The famous broadcaster and naturalist spent time with the Cambridge family at Kensington Palace, where they attended a screening of his new documentary ‘A Life On Our Planet’. 

In a sweet video posted by the Palace, Princess Charlotte can be seen asking Sir David Attenborough if he liked spiders, whilst Prince Louis questioned which animal was his favourite. 

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Prince George was also gifted a fossilied tooth from a carcharocles megalodon, a shark that is now extinct. 

When questioned about his motivations for establishing The Earthshot Prize, Prince William explained that he wished to create a better future for his children. He has also previously said that he wishes to be able to tell his three children that he “did my bit” in preserving the planet. 

During the interview, the future king said it would be “an absolute disaster” if Prince George were to be still having these conversations in 30 years time. 

The Earthshot Prize is due to announce its five winners in a star-studded ceremony at Alexandra Palace on Sunday evening. Five organisations or projects will receive £1million to advance their innovative solutions in tackling the climate emergency, as part of an awards scheme that has been hailed as “the most ambitious environmental prize in history”.

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