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Queen readies for ‘spectacular event’ to mark official birthday despite lockdown rules

Queen's official birthday to be 'spectacular event' says expert

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Queen Elizabeth will mark her official birthday on June 12, nearly two weeks before lockdown measures are expected to be lifted in full. Her Majesty and the rest of the Royal Family will mark the occasion at Windsor Castle with a scaled-down version of Trooping the Colour according to the royal expert. The celebrations will take place two days after what would have been Prince Philip’s 100th birthday.

Russell Myers told ITV’s Lorraine show: “Normally we have a big pomp and pageantry ceremony of Trooping the Colour. It’s going to have to be scaled down a bit this year because of coronavirus.” 

“However, it’s going to be a great occasion back at Windsor Castle, hopefully, there’ll be a few more of the soldiers getting out and about.”

“I’m promised it’ll still be a spectacular event.” 

The Trooping the Colour procession usually consists of over 1,400 soldiers, 200 horses, and 400 musicians that traditionally march from Buckingham Palace down The Mall towards Downing Street. 

Members of the Royal Family usually follow the procession in horse-drawn carriages or on horseback.

The celebration ends with the Queen and the Royal Family standing on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, with a fly-past from the RAF. 

Under normal circumstances, large crowds would gather outside Buckingham Palace and down The Mall to observe the procession and cheer the Queen. 

In last year’s ceremony, members of the public were not allowed to attend and the Queen observed the pageantry unaccompanied by her family. 

The Trooping the Colour procession highlights the Royal Family’s strong connections with the British Army and the Queen’s position as Head of the Armed Forces. 

Although this is not Her Majesty’s actual birthday, it is the date that is recognised as her ‘official birthday’, a tradition that has been in existence with British monarchs since 1748. 

Since 1959, the Queen’s ‘official’ birthday has been recognised as the second Saturday of June.

Queen Elizabeth was born on April 21st, 1926 at her grandparents’ home in Mayfair. 

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She usually celebrates her birthday privately with her family, however, the occasion is marked with a series of gun salutes.

This includes a 41-gun salute in Hyde Park, a 62-gun salute at the Tower of London and a 21-gun salute in Windsor Great Park. 

This year, however, the gun salutes were cancelled due to COVID-19 and the death of her husband Prince Philip on April 9, 2021. 

The Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral took place on April 17 at Windsor Castle and highlighted his close connections with the Navy and the sea.

The Royal Family entered a mourning period of two weeks following his death. 

The Queen’s 95th birthday in April was the first time she had celebrated her birthday without him in over 73 years. 

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