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Queen sees Sophie Wessex ‘as another daughter’ as Countess ‘showed different side to her’

Sophie Wessex and Edward: 'Spotlight' on couple says expert

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The monarch, 95, and her daughter-in-law Sophie, 56, are known to be close friends. However, since the death of the Duke of Edinburgh, Sophie has demonstrated just how trusted she is by being the one to relay the information about how exactly he died. She also got very choked up in an interview talking about her father-in-law, highlighting how much he really meant to her.

Pod Save the Queen is hosted by Ann Gripper and features Daily Mirror royal editor Russell Myers.

Mr Myers claimed the Queen sees Sophie as “another daughter”, having only one blood daughter in Princess Anne.

Mr Myers said: “It’s no secret that the royals are happy to push them out in front.

“Certainly, Sophie ‒ I think we saw a different side to her after Prince Philip’s death and she was the one who was breaking to the world the nature of him slipping away and saying that it was peaceful.

“And I think that people saw quite a different side to her, that she is not only a trusted member of the family to be able to confidently relay that information…

“But certainly, as we’ve been speaking over the past couple of years, her closeness with the Queen, that she gets on very very well with the Queen, the Queen sees her like another daughter.

“And certainly with Edward, as well, the family are becoming more popular figureheads, really.”

He added that there has been lots of “noise” in recent years around the rift between the Cambridges and the Sussexes.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry leaving the Royal Family and doing their interview with Oprah Winfrey has been something of a distraction from the work the Royal Family does.

Meanwhile, the Wessexes have been quietly getting on with their duties, and they are “respected” for how they just get on with the job.

Indeed, they are getting more recognition for everything they do with their charities and organisations now that Meghan and Harry have left.

Mr Myers predicted seeing “a lot more of the Wessexes” in future months, perhaps even seeing more engagements in Scotland.

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The royals have been spending a lot of time north of the border recently, amid concerns over nationalism and a push for a second independence referendum.

Prince William and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge visited to mark the Duke’s appointment as Lord High Commissioner of the Church of Scotland, while the Queen showed her face during Royal Week last week.

She was joined by both Prince William and Princess Anne on different days of the annual stay at Holyrood.

The Wessexes, too, have been doing engagements in Scotland, and this likely won’t be the end of it.

Sophie is said to be the Queen’s favourite daughter-in-law and her children Lady Louise Windsor and James, Viscount Severn her favourite grandchildren.

In 2019, a royal source told The Sun: “The Queen loves the fact that Louise and James relish their time at Balmoral, and she has become particularly close to Louise, who seems to have become her favourite grandchild, closely followed by James.

“Louise also endeared herself to everyone by looking after William and Kate’s children when they were up here.”

Louise and the Queen share a love of riding and the late Duke of Edinburgh was said to be “pleased” that his granddaughter had taken up his sport of carriage-driving.

Meanwhile, James reminds the Queen of her mother, as they share a love of fly-fishing.

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