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Who’s on strike today and how will it affect you? Daily update for January 4

Today is a huge day for industrial action across the UK.

Commuters back at work after the Christmas break face travel chaos again as around 40,000 workers on Network Rail and 14 train operating companies continue striking.

But it’s not the end, as those from The National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers are also set to walk out later in the week, on January 6 and 7.

They’re joined on Wednesday by London bus workers at Abellio, who are striking for eight days in total this month.

Drivers are also being asked to plan ahead as PCS union members at National Highways take action.

Driving tests have been disrupted today – with DVSA driving examiners’ strike starting in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

Meanwhile, PCS members working in the Rural Payments Agency Customer Service Centre will be striking in Workington, Newcastle and Caernarfon.

Timeline of strikes over the next few weeks

– January 4

The DVSA driving examiners’ strike starts in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

Traffic officer service workers at National Highways will continue their walkout.

The RMT rail workers’ strike continues.

UK-wide National Highways strike continues.

RPA staff will continue their walkout.

London bus workers at Abellio to go on strike.

– January 5

Train workers at 15 operators with the Aslef union to stage a 24-hour walkout.

The DVSA strike continues in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

RPA staff will continue their walkout.

London bus workers at Abellio to go on strike.

– January 6

RMT rail workers will stage another 48-hour strike.

National Highways workers to stage a two-day action in the East Midlands and eastern England.

The DVSA strike continues in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

RPA staff to continue their walkout.

– January 7

The RMT rail workers’ walkout continues.

National Highways workers will continue their strike in the East Midlands and eastern England.

The DVSA strike continues in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

– January 8

The DVSA strike continues in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

– January 9

The DVSA strike continues in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

RPA staff to continue their walkout.

– January 10

The Educational Institute of Scotland (EIS) union will stage a national strike in primary schools, special schools and early years sites.

The DVSA strike continues in London, the South East, South Wales and the South West.

RPA staff to continue their walkout.

London bus workers at Abellio to go on strike.

– January 11

Unison members working for five ambulance services in England will stage a fresh walkout.

The GMB union, also representing ambulance staff, has now scheduled further strike action for this date.

EIS, joined by the Scottish Secondary Teachers’ Association, will stage another national strike in secondary schools and secondary special schools.

RPA staff will continue their walkout.

– January 12

Workers on London’s Elizabeth line will go on strike.

London bus workers at Abellio will also stage industrial action.

RPA staff will continue their walkout.

– January 13

RPA staff to continue their walkout.

– January 16

EIS to stage a national strike for 16 consecutive days until February 2, which will see members in two local authorities strike each day.

London bus workers at Abellio will go on strike.

– January 18

Royal College of Nursing (RCN) members in England will strike.

– January 19

London bus workers at Abellio will go on strike.

RCN members in England will continue their strike.

– January 23

Unison members working for five ambulance services in England will stage another walkout.

– January 25

London bus workers at Abellio will go on strike.

– January 26

London bus workers at Abellio will continue strike.

Their jobs are to answer calls from members of the rural communities and the general public for the RPA on farm subsidies, payments for other rural businesses and other topics like the Pet Travel Scheme. 

The mass unrest comes amid rows over pay and conditions, with the dire cost of living crisis continuing to push up energy bills, food costs and fuel prices.

Train passengers are being warned to expect ‘significant disruption’ as only a limited number of trains will run today.

RMT union leader Mick Lynch said yesterday he understands frustration over the strikes, but advised disgruntled commuters to also ‘look at what the government and the companies are doing’.

Speaking from a picket line at London’s Euston station, he said the rail companies cannot run services properly on non-strike days, let alone on days when industrial action is being taken.

There is ‘very strong support’ among the public for the walkouts, he added, although he acknowledged that not everyone feels this way.

When asked if he had a message to those angry about the disruption, he said: ‘We understand that anger and that frustration, and we understand why they might blame us, but they should also look at what the Government and the companies are doing.

‘We want to get the railway back to normal. We want good industrial relations and we want the services to run the way they should be running.

‘The companies can’t run them on non-strike days, never mind when we’re out. So, we need to change the equation and get a settlement to the dispute as quickly as possible, and that will mean the public can rely on the railway and get the services they need.’

Transport Secretary Mark Harper has urged the RMT to get ‘off the picket line and round the negotiating table’.

He said there ‘is a very fair pay offer on the table, which has been accepted by two of the trade unions on Network Rail’.

Tim Shoveller, Network Rail’s chief negotiator, said the Government-owned company wants to ‘work with the RMT now to make clarifications where there’s been misunderstanding’ with the rejected offer, and put it to another vote.

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