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YouTube is testing hiding dislike counts to stop 'targeted campaigns' against creators and protect their well-being

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Jaguar launches I-Pace electric SUV

Jaguar has launched its all-electric I-Pace SUV in India, with prices starting from ₹ 1.06 crore (ex-showroom, India). The I-Pace is available in three trims — the S, SE, and top-spec HSE. The I-Pace SUV is powered by two electric motors that produce a combined 400hp and 696Nm of torque. It is equipped with a 90kWh battery pack that gives it a claimed range of up to 470km (WLTP) on a single charge. With an 11kW home charger, the I-Pace’s battery takes 12.9 hours to charge to full, though a 50kW charger is said to deliver up to 270km of range per hour.

In terms of equipment, the I-Pace packs in kit such as 19-inch alloy wheels, LED headlamps, a full-length fixed-glass roof, dual infotainment touchscreens running ‘Pivi Pro’, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto support, ‘InControl’ connected-car tech, powered tailgate and more. Fully kitted out variants, meanwhile, add tech such as Matrix LED headlamps, adaptive cruise control, a head-up display, ‘Windsor’ leather sport seats, a 825W Meridian sound system, and more. Buyers can also option bits such as four-zone climate control and air suspension on the SUV.

Jaguar has partnered with Tata Power to provide home and office charging options to all I-Pace customers.Jaguar has also installed over 35 DC fast chargers across 22 of its dealerships, spread over 19 cities. The electric SUV also comes with a complimentary 7.4kW AC wall-mounted charger.

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Bobo’s Maple Pecan Oat Bars Being Recalled For Undeclared Peanuts

Bobo’s recalled one lot of Bobo’s Maple Pecan Oat Bars for containing undeclared peanuts, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or FDA said in a statement.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered that the product containing peanuts was distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanuts on the ingredient list.

The company warned that the consumption of the product by people allergic or having severe sensitivity to peanuts could lead to serious or life-threatening allergic reactions. However, the Boulder, Colorado-based company is yet to receive any reports of adverse reactions or illness due to the consumption of these products.

The recall involves 3-oz Maple Pecan Bars that may be a single bar or in a box of 12, which can be identified by the lot code 0L30112B found on a stamp on the back of the bar with Best By date 7/30/21 or 7/31/21. The company noted that no other product with this best buy date was impacted.

The Maple Pecan Bars were distributed through retail stores across the U.S. and through online orders at www.eatbobos.com.

Bobo’s urged consumers who have purchased the affected lot to return the product to where it was purchased to request an exchange or full refund if there is an allergy concern. They should also not consume it and discard the affected product in a secure place.

YouTube is testing hiding dislike counts to stop 'targeted campaigns' against creators and protect their well-being

  • YouTube is experimenting with removing public “dislike” counts on some videos.
  • The aim is to protect creator well-being by heading off “targeted dislike campaigns.”
  • The company called it a “small experiment” and did not say how many creators were involved.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

YouTube is testing hiding “dislike” counts on videos as a way of stopping users from ganging up on creators.

“In response to creator feedback around well-being and targeted dislike campaigns, we’re testing a few new designs that don’t show the public dislike count,” YouTube said in a statement.

It said some creators would see the design change over the next few weeks as part of “this small experiment.”

The change is targeted at preventing a phenomenon known as “dislike mobs,” when an online group deliberately target a video with dislikes en masse.

In 2019, YouTube’s then-director of product management Tom Leung said options for preventing dislike mobs were being “lightly discussed” inside the company.

Creators will still be able to see how many dislikes they’ve had on a video by using in-house analytics.

YouTube did not say how how many creators would be trialling its new design, and did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.