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Biden's approval rating recovers to 40% as he weighs 2024 plans

Biden’s approval rating recovers to 40% after his 80th birthday and surprising midterms – as wait continues for announcement on his 2024 plans

  • Biden’s approval rating sits at 40% in new Reuters/Ipsos poll
  • His disapproval rating is at 55%
  • But his 40% is up three points from 37% earlier this year
  • Biden has yet to announce his plans for 2024 election
  • He has said it’s his  ‘intention’ to run for a second term
  • Said he will make his final decision in the new year 

President Joe Biden’s approval rating is sitting at 40% as the wait continues for the announcement on his plans for the 2024 election.

Biden has said it’s his ‘intention’ to run for a second term but that he wouldn’t make a final decision until the new year.

But his approval rating in this new Reuters/Ipsos poll is up 3 percentage points from 37% in a Nov. 21-22 poll. In this week’s poll 55% disapprove of his presidency.

The president’s approval rating has been all over the map during his two years in office as voters praised him for his handling of the COVID pandemic but then turned on him when record-high inflation increased the cost of living. 

In this latest poll, Biden was boosted by greater approval from Democrats, who are celebrating the fact the party did better than expected in the 2022 midterm election.

President Joe Biden’s approval rating is sitting at 40% as the wait continues for the announcement on his plans for the 2024 election

Democrats maintained control of the Senate and, while Republicans took the majority in the House, it was not the massive red wave of seats that many predicted. 

Additionally, Biden turned 80 earlier this month and there was some chatter among Democrats it was time for a new generation of leaders.

He is the oldest president ever elected and, if he ran and won again in 2024, he would be 86 at the end of a second term. 

But the party’s strong performance in the midterm has quieted much of that with many party members seeing Biden as their strongest choice for the presidential nominee in the 2024 election. 

On the Republican side, Donald Trump announced this month he will run for the presidency again, despite a poor midterms showing for MAGA-candidates he backed. 

He’ll likely face stiff competition from GOP golden boy Ron DeSantis, who comfortably won re-election as Florida governor earlier this month.

DeSantis is widely-seen as the person to push Trump’s popular policies, but without the ex-president’s divisive personality that repelled small-c conservatives and centrist swing voters. 

Biden had originally said he would discuss running for a second term when he was with wife Jill Biden and his adult children in Nantucket for Thanksgiving. 

But, during that trip, he admitted the topic hadn’t come up.

‘We’re not having any, we’re celebrating!’ Biden told reporters when asked how those 2024 discussions were going. 

DailyMail.com later asked him if he’d made a decision about launching a reelection bid. 

‘Not yet,’ he said.

As the incumbent, Biden faces less pressure to announce his intentions. Many potential Democratic contenders have already said they will defer to the commander-in-chief.


California Gov. Gavin Newsom  (left) told Politico that he has told the White House that he is ‘all in’ on Biden running for re-election; Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (right), who handily won re-election this year, told the Detroit News she plans to serve out her full four-year term

California Gov. Gavin Newsom told Politico that he has told the White House that he is ‘all in’ on Biden running for re-election and told Biden himself that during a phone call on Election Day earlier this month. 

‘I’ve told everyone in the White House, from the chief of staff to the first lady,’ he said, saying his message is ‘I’m all in, count me in’ on Biden’s re-election bid.

And Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, who handily won re-election this year, told the Detroit News she plans to serve out her full four-year term, meaning she won’t be a 2024 contender.

‘I don’t want to run for President,’ she told a Michigan TV station. 

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