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How you can see the Red Arrows TODAY

How you can see the Red Arrows TODAY: Map shows route the famous RAF aerobatic team will take over the UK before and after their performance at Farnborough Airshow

  • Jets will fly from their home base at RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire at 11.58am  
  • Then zoom down to Farnborough via Leicestershire, Oxfordshire and Hampshire 
  • Brits all over the country have a chance of glimpsing the Red Arrows today  

The Red Arrows are set to light up the skies of the UK today as they travel to Farnborough Airshow for the event’s final day. 

Starting at 11.58am, the jets will fly from their home base at RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire. 

Then they zoom down to Farnborough going over Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Hampshire. 

So Brits all over the country could have a chance of glimpsing the famous red aircraft. 

Starting at 11.58am, the jets will fly from their home base at RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire. A view of the flyover by the Red Arrows, at the opening of Farnborough International Airshow four days ago

In order to be eligible for the Red Arrows, pilots have to have completed one or more operational tours on a fast jet such as the Tornado, Harrier or Typhoon

The acrobatic displays opened the event at the Farnborough International Exhibition & Conference Centre for one of the world’s biggest aerospace events four days ago.

The quintessentially British spectacle will also close the international show this afternoon.

The last time the Red Arrows flew was on June 26 on their way to the Goodwood Festival of Speed. 

And before then they impressed the Queen at her Platinum Jubilee, with the monarch saying ‘how incredbile’ the aircraft looked on June 2.  

The RAF Red Arrows perform a flypast over Horeguards parade, on June 2, 2022 in London for the Queen’s Jubilee 

Trooping The Colour, also known as The Queen’s Birthday Parade, is a military ceremony performed by regiments of the British Army that has taken place since the mid-17th century

The Red Arrows perform a flypast after the Trooping the Colour ceremony in London, Thursday June 2, 2022, on the first of four days of celebrations to mark the Platinum Jubilee

The acrobatic displays opened the event at the Farnborough International Exhibition & Conference Centre for one of the world’s biggest aerospace events four days ago. Pictured: Red Arrows flying over London to celebrate VE Day last year

The quintessentially British spectacle will also close the international show this afternoon. The RAF Red Arrows perform during the Armed Forces Day National Event 2022 on June 25

RAF Scampton – 11.58am

Fiskerton – 12pm

Billingborough – 12.03pm

Stapleford – 12.07pm

Northampton – 12.12pm

Buckingham – 12.15pm

Bishopstone – 12.20pm

Ramsbury – 12.22pm

Newbury – 12.24pm

Whitchurch – 12.25pm

Odiham – 12.28pm

Farnborough Airshow Flypast – 12.30pm

Holybourne – 12.31pm

Ford – 12.37pm

Market Harborough – 12.45pm

North Searle – 12.51pm

RAF Scampton – 12.53pm

The Queen, 96, stepped out on the Buckingham Palace balcony and watched more than 70 aircraft including Apache helicopter, Typhoons and the Red Arrows dance through the air for six minutes. 

The Royal Navy Wildcast, Royal Navy Merlin and British Army Apache helicopters appeared first in London for the jubilee. 

And Puma and Chinook helicopters then flew over the palace followed by the Lancaster, three Spitfires and two Hurricanes, operated by the RAF’s Battle of Britain Memorial flight. 

The Red Arrows team is made up of some of the best Royal Air Force pilots available, with training taking place in Britain until mid-spring, before moving overseas to a location with more predictable, settled weather, so that they can take advantage of longer flying hours and perfect the display.

In order to be eligible, pilots have to have completed one or more operational tours on a fast jet such as the Tornado, Harrier or Typhoon.

They also need more than 1,500 flying hours and have to be assessed as ‘above average’ before they can even be considered for a voluntary position on the team.

The team is assessed by senior Royal Air Force officers, with the aim of gaining Public Display Authority.

If this is awarded, the squadron’s pilots change from green coveralls into their famous red flying suits and the ground crew are allowed to wear their royal blue display coveralls.

When the season officially begins and public performances by the Red Arrows are permitted.

THE RED ARROWS: A history of the famed British aerobatic team based at RAF Scampton

The Red Arrows were formed of a number of RAF teams in late 1964 after display pilots started focusing so much on their formations there was no time for military training.

Now, pilots chosen to be on the team have to have completed one or more operational tours on a fast jet such as the Tornado, Harrier or Typhoon. They also need more than 1,500 flying hours and have to be assessed as ‘above average’ before they can even be considered for a voluntary position on the team.

Successful pilots wear green during the training months between October to April, graduating to red once they have been awarded Public Display Authority. Then they travel the world performing displays at public events. The Red Arrows are reported to cost between £5million and £6million each year.

In 1966 the team of seven was increased to nine, to allow for more complex formations. Their trademark diamond nine was then created. In late 1979 the team switched from Follard Gnats to BAE Hawks. 

During performances the crew leave streams of red, white and blue behind them. 

The basic vapour colour is white, produced by injecting diesel into the hot exhaust from the jet engine. This reaches temperatures of over 400C and vaporises immediately. The blue and red colours are made by mixing dye with the diesel. 

On Armed Forces Day last year, the Red Arrows performed a fly past over the skies of North Yorkshire. The distinctive Hawk fast jets flew over the British’s Army Catterick Garrison, RAF Leeming and the coastal town of Scarborough. Scarborough were due to host this year’s Armed Forces Day National Event which was cancelled due to the coronavirus outbreak

The team have performed more than 4,800 displays in 57 countries worldwide and took the name the Red Arrows after their planes were painted that colour for safety reasons, and a French journalism penned the phrase ‘Les Fleches Rouges’.

Starting at RAF Little Rissingtonin, in Gloucestershire, the team were moved to RAF Kemble, now Cotsworld Airport, in 1966. They moved to their now home, RAF Scampton, in 1983, before being shifted again 20 miles away to RAF Cranwell. By 2000 they were back at RAF Scampton, where they have stayed. 

In July 2018 the RAF announced that RAF Scampton would close by 2022, and in May 2020 it was announced the Red Arrows would be relocated to nearby RAF Waddington, but will continue to use airspace above RAF Scampton for their training.

Accidents and deaths 

In 2018 Red Arrows pilot David Stark parachuted to safety after ejecting moments before his plane hit the ground and erupted into a ball of fire. Trapped inside was engineer Jonathan Bayliss. The 41-year-old was killed instantly as the Hawk T1 crashed less than two minutes after take-off.

Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham, 35, was killed at RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, after being accidentally ejected from his Hawk T1 while he conducted pre-flight safety checks as his plane was on the ground.

The South-African officer, who grew up in Coventry, was thrown 300ft and his parachute failed to deploy during the incident on November 8, 2011.

An inquest heard he was ejected because of a problem with the ejection seat firing handle, which had been pulled into an unsafe position by accident.

The ejector seat’s makers, Martin-Baker Aircraft Ltd, was fined £1.1 million at Lincoln Crown Court after admitting to breaching safety laws in relation to Flt Lt Cunningham’s death.

Three months earlier, Flt Lt Egging, 33, died after crashing at the Bournemouth Air Festival.

An inquest heard he may have succumbed to G-force impairment before attempting to correct his course in the moments before the impact.

Bournemouth coroner Sheriff Payne recorded a verdict of accidental death.

An earlier service inquiry, led by Wing Commander Mark Rodden, concluded the crash was ‘most likely’ caused by ‘A-loc’ – where G-force caused an almost total loss of consciousness due to G-force.

There have been 16 other reported crashes involving Red Arrows since 1969, which have involved 10 fatalities.

The first death, in 1969, involved a pilot flying into trees while practising.

In the worst tragedy to hit the display team, Flt Lt Euan Perreaux, Flt Lt John Lewis, Flt Lt John Haddock and Flt Lt Colin Armstrong were killed when two Gnat aircraft collided mid-air at RAF Kemble, Gloucestershire, in 1971.

Two more pilots were killed in 1978 and another in 1988. But there were no more fatalities until the 2011 deaths. 

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