World News

Man confesses to rape and murder of at least nine girls, say police in India

Police said the man, who has not been named, had admitted killing girls aged between three and seven in New Delhi and three other cities, including slums around Gurugram.

The 20-year-old was arrested on Monday on charges of raping and killing a three-year-old earlier this month.

“He used to first break the legs of the victims before attempting rape,” said Subhash Boken, an assistance inspector and public relations officer with Gurugram police.

“Then he would murder them.”

The man, who police say was unemployed aside from casual work as a daily labourer, said he looked for his victims in community kitchens that gave free food to vulnerable people.

He told police he lured young girls with sweets and money, then abducted them.

Reports of brutal abductions and murder of children are not uncommon in India.

A growing public outcry over young and marginalised children being killed in horrific circumstances has led to protests – and sparked government action.

In April, the punishment for raping girls under the age of 12 was increased to the death penalty.

It followed uproar over the case of eight-year-old Asifa Bano, who was abducted from her nomadic Muslim tribe, raped, burned, bludgeoned with a rock and strangled.

Earlier this year, a wealthy businessman and his servant were also sentenced to death after the discovery of the remains of more than 18 people.

He was accused of killing and raping women and children who lived in slum areas around his home.

In a similar case in 2015, a man who was arrested over the murder of a six-year-old girl confessed to the killing of 15 others, who he said he had abducted and assaulted when drunk.

But the case has also drawn attention to the abilities of the police to properly investigate such crimes.

Indian authorities are known to publicly claim success in solving serious cases before extensive evidence or a trial. The suspect in the latest case has also yet to be formally charged.

“It is very unfortunate that such cases are still happening in India, despite the government framing a law and approving the death penalty for rape,” said Priti Mahara, an official of child rights organisation CRY.

“The police, government officials and society at large need to support the victims and their families.”

Source: Read Full Article