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Mick Jagger rolls up to back controversial 'snack tax' on sugary food

No brown sugar! Mick Jagger rolls up to back controversial ‘snack tax’ on sugary and salty food

  • Rolling Stones frontman, 77, praised the National Food Strategy proposals  
  • Sir Mick shared a link on Twitter and said: ‘I hope these plans will be taken up’  
  • Father-of-eight now follows strict health regime and works out three hours daily

Sir Mick Jagger has voiced his support for the proposed new tax on sugary and salty food.

The Rolling Stones frontman, 77, praised the National Food Strategy proposals and said they would lead to a ‘big change for the better’.

Sir Mick shared a link to the document on Twitter and wrote: ‘This report by @food-strategy has some interesting and far-reaching ideas that would mean a big change for the better in our food system and make us all healthier. 

‘I hope that these plans will be taken up by this Government.’

The Rolling Stones frontman, 77, praised the National Food Strategy proposals and said they would lead to a ‘big change for the better’

Contrary to the Stones’ hard-partying image in their heyday, the father-of-eight now follows a strict health regime and works out for three hours a day. 

His youngest child was born in 2016 when Jagger was 73. The rocker’s father Basil was a PE teacher who lived to 93 and taught him the value of regular exercise.

He called his father the ‘greatest influence’ in his life.

The super-slim Brown Sugar singer is understood to maintain his 28in-waist with a diet consisting mainly of chicken, fish, whole grains and fruit and veg. 

Sir Mick shared a link to the document on Twitter and wrote: ‘I hope that these plans will be taken up by this Government’

He has reportedly tried the Keto diet – a high-fat, low-carb regime.

Unilever has announced it will introduce carbon footprint labels on its products by the end of the year.

The British food, drink and toiletries giant, whose brands include Marmite, Pot Noodle and Sure anti-perspirant, said the move will make it easier for consumers to judge the impact of their purchases on the planet.

The footprint labels will be used in trials in Europe or North America and could be added to products in the UK by the end of 2022.

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