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Now NHS wants to hire £270k bosses: Recruitment drive fuels fears

Now NHS wants to hire £270k bosses: Recruitment drive fuels fears over where extra cash raised by social care reforms will be going

  • NHS will hire the new executives to make sure the new £36billion health and social care tax is spent wisely
  • Critics slammed the creation of 42 chief executives of integrated care boards
  • Seven jobs are advertised with salaries of £270,000, which is 80 per cent more than the Prime Minister earns

The NHS will hire dozens of new executives on salaries of up to £270,000 – to make sure the new £36billion health and social care tax is spent wisely.

The revelation fuelled growing fears about where the extra cash raised by Boris Johnson’s reforms will be going.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid promised yesterday to be ‘watchful for any waste and wokery’ over the £12billion a year raised by a 1.25 percentage point increase in national insurance.

But critics slammed the creation of 42 chief executives of integrated care boards in England, whose job will be to ‘deliver joined-up services’ across the NHS and social care.

The NHS will hire dozens of new executives on salaries of up to £270,000 – to make sure the new £36billion health and social care tax is spent wisely

The revelation fuelled growing fears about where the extra cash raised by Boris Johnson’s reforms will be going 

Online job adverts reveal each executive will be paid an average of £223,261.

Seven jobs are advertised with salaries of £270,000, which is 80 per cent more than the Prime Minister earns. According to the job adverts, successful candidates will need to be ‘politically astute’ and ‘actively champion diversity, inclusion, and equality of opportunity for all’.

Jake Berry, head of the Northern Research Group of Tories, said: ‘Throwing other people’s money down a bottomless pit doesn’t become a good idea if you put the NHS logo next to it.’

Another Conservative MP told the Daily Telegraph: ‘People on low salaries will have difficulty understanding why they are having to pay significantly more tax partly to pay mega salaries for these new posts.’

It comes amid warnings from economists that the NHS could swallow up most of the extra £12billion a year. The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) cast doubt on the Government’s pledge to use a new levy to both tackle the NHS backlog and fix social care.

Under the plans announced this week, the NHS will get the bulk of the £36billion raised in the first three years by the tax hike, with £5.4billion for social care in England. 

Seven jobs are advertised with salaries of £270,000, which is 80 per cent more than the Prime Minister earns 

The balance is expected to tip towards social care in subsequent years as the £86,000 cap on costs introduced from October 2023 starts to require funding. But the IFS suggested the health service would continue to require most of the new revenue. 

Research economist Ben Zaranko said: ‘The extra funding provided for the NHS will result in spending growing at 3.9 per cent a year between 2018/19 and 2024/25, exactly the same rate of growth as was planned between 2018/19 and 2023/24.

‘History suggests these plans will be topped up further. That could leave little, if any, of the tax rises available for social care.’

Mr Javid insisted the extra money would be moved from the NHS to social care. ‘It’s clear that more and more after three years will shift towards social care because, not least, by that time the money… that will go to the NHS will be able to deal with so much of the challenge they are facing around the waiting list,’ he told Times Radio.

The IFS warning came as the Resolution Foundation think-tank said the proportion of public service spending on the NHS would rise to 40 per cent by 2025, up from 28 per cent in 2004.

Its chief executive Torsten Bell said: ‘The Prime Minister has turned his back on low taxes in favour of an NHS-dominated state.’

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