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The Simpsons 'predicted' the petrol shortage back in 2010, fans claim on Twitter

FANS of The Simpsons have claimed the animated series "predicted" the petrol shortage sweeping the UK.

The country remains in fuel chaos amidst panic buying and a shortage of HGV drivers – and it seems Homer could have foreshadowed the madcap measures motorists are going to.


Renowned for its eerily accurate predictions of major life events, fans have now suggested The Simpsons envisioned the fuel frenzy over ten years ago.

The 2010 episode titled "Lisa Simpson, This Isn't Your Life" has become the focus of social media sleuths.

Homer is seen purchasing 1,000 gallons of fuel and free-pouring it into his car boot as he runs out of room for it, in a bid to claim a specific promotional toy for baby Maggie.

He carelessly pumps the fuel into the back of his car – seemingly mirroring the actions of greedy gas-guzzlers.

Thousands of Brits have been spotted naively filling up numerous jerry cans in their cars as the fight for fuel spirals – with health and safety seemingly disregarded.

A clip of The Simpsons episode has now caused a stir after being shared on social media alongside the caption: "Is there anything the Simpsons didn’t predict?!"

"Convinced the guy that made The Simpsons is definitely a time traveller," one confused commenter wrote.

"At this rate, we might as well just plan ahead using Simpson episodes," another said. "We're living in the Matrix!"

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A third chimed in: "So we are basically in an episode of the Simpsons… great."

It's not the first time The Simpsons has managed to predict key global occurrences either.

The show apparently foresaw the likes of Donald Trump's rise to power, the outbreak of Ebola virus, 9/11, and Kamala Harris' Vice-Presidency,

Despite there being no direct reference to a gas shortage in the 2010 episode, fans spotted similarities after seeing Homer determinedly filling up his car with fuel.

"Selfish" motorists in the UK have been filling up several containers in an attempt to secure a stockpile of fuel – but their hazardous life hacks have exacerbated safety concerns.

GREEDY PANIC BUYERS

One daft driver was seen emptying out WATER BOTTLES before filling them with petrol, seemingly oblivious to the danger of using the wrong container.

The woman is seen shamelessly emptying out a 1.5 litre plastic bottle and bending down to fill it up with fuel, before repeating the process with another.

Her forecourt faux pas was branded "ludicrous" as well as downright dangerous.

A lorry driver also complained after one hoarder filled up multiple jerry cans with petrol before stacking them in his boot.

He slammed the motorists cramming as much as they can into their tanks, jerry cans, and other containers as "really irritating".

Brawls have broken out on petrol station forecourts as frustrated drivers clashed while queuing at pumps – turning on each other in shocking scenes.

In one shocking incident, a driver allegedly pulled a KNIFE on another motorist before being run over in a row over petrol.

Roads are repeatedly blocked off by ridiculous queues that snake along for miles, forcing cops to be called in to help manage traffic as tensions flared.

"BEWARE"

But UK fuel giants – including BP, Shell and Esso – issued a joint statementinsisting "there is plenty of fuel" to go around, while encouraging "everyone to buy fuel as they usually would."

Panic buyers have now been warned to "beware" of carrying fuel reserves in their cars – as they could blow up.

Former senior officer in the London Fire Brigade Steve Dudeney shared the story of a haunting incident he was called to 12 years ago, alongside a picture of the devastation.

"This is a photo from an incident I attended 12 years ago," he wrote in a tweet.

"The man driving the car had filled some petrol containers up and placed them in the boot," he explained.

"The escaping petrol vapour met an ignition source in his car, this was the result. Panic buyers beware!!

"He was still alive but badly burned when I arrived, airlifted to a burns unit, I never heard if he survived."

Motorists rushing to grab as much fuel as possible are feared to be ignoring key safety rules for the sake of stashing as much as they can.


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